6 steps to publishing a blog post about your internship experience

A post about my internship on the Concur corporate blog.

A post about my internship on the Concur corporate blog.

You took the time to apply for that internship you really wanted. You got the interview, you knocked it out of the park, and you got the job!

Now you’re giving it your all and getting good feedback from your managers. What can you do to kick it up a notch?

Blog about it!

In an earlier post I outlined the reasons why you should blog about your internship, and now Read the rest of this entry »

Social Listening Psychosis: “Don’t answer me — JUST LISTEN!”*

San Francisco Zoo -- an organization that knows how to listen.

San Francisco Zoo — an organization that knows how to listen.

One of the things I love most about social media is the access that it gives consumers to brands. I especially love how that access makes closer relationships possible between them.

Smart brands listen to what consumers are saying about them online; hence, we have the term “social listening” (a term that you need to know if you are in business today, frankly.)

And the best brands respond.

One of my favorite brands that does a great job of listening is the San Francisco Zoo. They routinely do things on Twitter like this:

The San Francisco Zoo listens and responds to online mentions.

The San Francisco Zoo generates engagement by listening online and responding to mentions.

The social media person at the zoo clearly takes time to monitor what’s being said about the organization online — and responds.

The Zoo's responses to online mentions often aim to add value to customers' experience.

The Zoo’s typical response to an online mention often aims to add value to the customer’s experience.

And it’s proactive relationship building — no crises here, just friendly “hey, how was your visit, we’re really glad you came out to see us, here’s a tip to make your trip even better.” Genius!

Thought leaders like Bryan Kramer of PureMatter believe that social listening is incredibly important — and in some cases it’s even an ingredient in the alchemy that creates brand loyalists.

But it looks like we may be beginning to see some backlash. Brian Solis of Altimeter recently posted analysis of an infographic that seems to say consumers don’t necessarily want brands to listen so closely and respond all the time. It sounds like people want access to brands, but they don’t necessarily want brands to hover like helicopter parents.

If you look at the Netbase infographic that Solis posted, they urge brands to be smart about listening and responding. And that advice absolutely makes sense. Social media is about personalizing and interacting, not “spraying and praying.” It might take a couple of extra seconds, but really analyzing the context of what you’re hearing before you respond — if you respond — may help your brand avoid alienating potential brand advocates.

Yes, we’re reminded yet again that there is an art that dances cheek-to-cheek with the science behind marketing communications.

I’m incredibly curious — what do you think? Do you sometimes feel that brands listen a little too closely? Do you sometimes want to be able to mention brands online without a response?

*Quotation in the title is based on a line from one of my favorite movies, Sordid Lives, written and directed by the inimitable Del Shores.

And the winner of the Hottest Super Bowl Ad* Award is ….

You can still dunk in the dark. At the Super Bowl.

You can still dunk in the dark. At the Super Bowl.


*On Facebook and Twitter

Now I have to admit I am not much of a football or Super Bowl person. But as a marketing nerd, obviously I’m watching what’s going on from the sidelines — especially on social media!

And when the lights went out in New Orleans (did Beyoncé blow a fuse?) giving America a longer potty break than usual, smart brands knew that mobile devices and laptops would be humming with activity. 

Oreo’s team swooped in and dropped the above photo on the unsuspecting Facebook- and Twitterspheres.

Just absolutely brilliant. Timely, humorous, great design … and almost 15,000 likes and nearly 5,000 shares. And climbing. Not to mention that a *lot* of people were left craving an Oreo cookie!

Oreos — the (un)official cookie of Super Bowl XLVII!

What outstanding examples of social media use did you see during the Super Bowl? What would you have done?

*Honorable mention goes to Duracell, which went to Facebook with a photo of the darkened half of the Superdome plus the text, “If only Duracell was powering the lights …” and then cheekily added “Looks like they used some Duracell batteries! You’re welcome. Enjoy the game. #TrustYourPower” once the lights came back on.


Excellent coverage of how Oreo did it from Rachel Sanders at BuzzFeed.

HubSpot offers a solid replay of brands that jumped on the blackout.

Virgin America — a lesson from a brand that knows how to engage

information about baggage requirements at LAX a few years back

Virgin America  — what a brand!  I have been pretty much obsessed with them ever since they first started flying out of SFO in 2007.

There is a lot to love — the gleaming Airbuses decked out in red and white livery, the mod white interiors, not to mention the gorgeous ads and cooler-than-Kenneth-Cole communications.

Virgin America has grown into a carefully crafted brand selling an experience just as much as it sells transportation. It feels like flying with Virgin America is embarking on an experience with like-minded people going to similar places to do similar COOL things. Read the rest of this entry »

Crisis Management Choose-Your-Own-Adventure Time!


So my hometown hospital back in Virginia just got listed as #8 on a list of the 10 most unsafe hospitals in the US in Consumer Reports magazine. Read the rest of this entry »